Last edited by Dirg
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Medieval Ewell and Cuddington. found in the catalog.

Medieval Ewell and Cuddington.

C. F. Titford

Medieval Ewell and Cuddington.

by C. F. Titford

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  • 15 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in [S.l.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reprinted from Surrey archaeological collections,v.69, 1973.

Other titlesSurrey archaeological collections.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14533648M

communities of Cheam, Cuddington, Ewell, Malden and Morden. Frequent disputes took place concerning the all-important rights of common, and in the midth century the two earliest maps or ‚plotts™ of the area were drawn up to settle one such dispute. A colour photograph of the later and more detailed of these is included in David™s book. Epsom and Ewell. Reigate and Banstead. Old Maps Online. Timeline Attributes. Drag sliders to specify date range From: past

The park contains Nonsuch Mansion, also called Nonsuch Park House, which was built in the mid-eighteenth century and extended by Jeffry Wyattville at the beginning of the nineteenth in Tudor Gothic style. It is Grade II* listed by English Heritage.. There was a chalk quarry located in what is now the gardens of Nonsuch Mansion. It dates back to at least as it was marked "Chalk Pitt" on an. Reigate Priory was founded in the early 13th century, and in , at the Reformation, the Priory Manor was granted to William, Lord Howard, with the estates passing to his son Charles, Lord Howard, who was Lord Admiral in command at the defeat of the Spanish Armada in The Priory was bought in by Reigate Borough Council and the main building and its immediate grounds are used for.

Cheam is a large suburban village in the London Borough of Sutton, England, and is located just inside the southern boundary of Greater London where it meets Surrey.. Cheam is bordered by Worcester Park (to the north-west), Morden (to the north-east), Sutton (to the east), Ewell (to the west) as well as Banstead and Belmont to the South. Copthorne comprised the manors of Ashtead, Cuddington, Ewell, Headley, Mickleham, Tadworth and Walton-on-the-Hill, it had two enclaves, areas of other parishes dominated by manors and sometimes churches within it: in Weybridge and Newdigate. In the Domesday Book, the settlements of Ashtead and Mickleham were included in the Wallington.


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Medieval Ewell and Cuddington by C. F. Titford Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ewell's largest landmark is Bourne Hall in the centre of the town. It is a modernist circular structure with a central glass dome, and is surrounded by a stream-side public park with a pond at one end and a fountain.

The building, which is reminiscent of an immense flying saucer, houses a public library, subterranean theatre, gymnasium, café and local ct: Epsom and Ewell.

Cuddington, a medieval village near Ewell with its own church, was demolished in the 16th century to allow Nonsuch Palace and its associated parks to be built.

The parish name is still in use today, and a new church was built in the Worcester Park suburb in the north of the district. There were Saxons in Ewell and in Domesday Book recorded it as a royal manor valued at 16 and it remained in the hands of the King until granted to Merton Priory in In Tudor times, Ewell lost some of its land when Henry VIII had Nonsuch Palace built in the neighbouring parish of Cuddington.

Construction of Nonsuch started in The Domesday Book of records 52 tenants, presumably tenant-farmers; and a later survey or custumal of68, including Ralph the Chapman, William the Tanner, Richard the Mason and Thomas the Carter (Harte,Scenes from Medieval Life in Epsom, Ewell and Cuddington ). Later inhabitants of what at the time would evidently have.

The King holds in demesne EWELL. TRE it answered for 16 hides less one virgate. Now for 13 hides and a half to the farm.

Medieval Ewell and Cuddington. book for In demesne is 1 plough and 48 villans and 4 bordars with 15 ploughteams. There are 2 mills at 10 shillings and 14 acres of meadow. Woodland: at pigs. From grazing: 11 pigs. In medieval times, both Epsom and Ewell were small rural communities, with Epsom being smaller than Ewell.

The major event for Tudor Ewell was the building of Nonsuch Palace by Henry VIII in to celebrate thirty years of his reign. The church and village of Cuddington were wiped away so that the Palace could be built. This manor was then worth 5 marks and included a barn worth 4s. and two tenements, acres of land, 26s.

rent in the parishes of Ewell and Cuddington worth 5 marks, and was said to be held of the Prior of Merton, service unknown. John and Rose died so seised and William and Anne entered and were seised in fee tail.

Cuddington The plan of the medieval church of Cuddington became evident when the foundations were uncovered during the Nonsuch Palace excavation directed by Martin Biddle. In his report, published in Medieval Archaeology (4 pp–5) inhe stated that in Period 1 the church was a simple two-cell structure, and is presumably the building.

The year the book, article or report was published. Ewell, Surrey. 1 - 26 Medieval Ewell and Cuddington. Charles F Titford: 27 - 35 Woodcote, or Woodcote Warren, once a City, according to Tradition.

K W Muckelroy. Ewell (/ˈjuːəl,_ˈjuːl/ YOUW-el) is a suburban area in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey with a largely commercial village centre.

Apart from this it has named neighbourhoods: West Ewell, Ewell Court, East Ewell, Ewell Grove, and Ewell Downs. One rural locality on the slopes of the North Downs is also a neighbourhood, North Looe. Remaining a large parish, Ewell occupies Dialling code: The history of the site may go back as far as an iron age settlement, but there are strong links to the Roman and medieval eras.

The village of Cuddington (Codintone) was recorded in the the Domesday Book, but was demolished by Henry VIII to make way for a palace that was never completed in his lifetime and was subsequently demolished and sold. Situated on the slopes of the North Downs, Gatton - meaning goat farm - was recorded in the Domesday Book and had two MPs in However, after the medieval period the settlement shrank to the extent it was abolished as a parliamentary borough in If you know of any abandoned places in London let us know by emailing ell Author: Ellie Mckinnell.

Surrey's largest town and a prominent shopping, office and cultural centre. It was the seat of the Archbishops of Canterbury from the 11th to 19th century and a large medieval market town. The church of St. John the Baptist, founded in the 10th century, was rebuilt in the 19th.

Cuddington. Minute book and list of tenants in the manors of Ewell and Cuddington, /10/ Description of parcels in the manors of Ewell and Cuddington,   Pottery was produced locally throughout the medieval period. There were kilns in Cheam, Kingston and Ewell.

Remains of local pots and jugs have been found in excavations in the City of London and Essex and in a hoard of medieval coins was found in Thurrock, Essex in the remains of a Cheam drinking jug.

Ewell / ˈ juː ᵊ l / is a suburban area in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey with a largely commercial village centre. Apart from this it has named neighbourhoods: West Ewell, Ewell Court, East Ewell, Ewell Grove, and Ewell rural locality on the slopes of the North Downs is also a neighbourhood, North ing a large parish, Ewell occupies approximately the north – density: 2,/km² (6,/sq mi).

Ewell's largest landmark is the architecturally impressive Bourne Hall in the centre of the town but not currently listed. Retaining a listed garden wall and waterwheel of Garbrand Hall, the large mansion it replaced, Bourne Hall is now a modernist circular structure with a central glass dome, and is surrounded by a diverse stream-side public park.

There is a pond at one end with ducks and. Part of the Medieval (possibly Early Medieval or even Roman) trackway Vicarage Lane passes through the southwest of the park from Ewell Castle School towards the site of Nonsuch Palace and would have originally passed through the village of Cuddington.

The track is now considerably sunken but is still a public right of way. gives Ewell with Cuddington as a combined holding of 30 hides).

While this might at first be seen to infer the former existence of a vast royal estate coterminous with Copthorne Hundred, it may be more credible to conceive of the latter being formed in the late Anglo-Saxon period from two extensive landholdings centred on Ewell and Leather.

The fresh spring waters of Ewell were one of Henry’s motivations for choosing this location for Nonsuch.

The Renaissance fashion for Roman-style bathing and mineral water medical treatment were embraced by Henry’s court doctors, and Nonsuch combined the health and pleasure aspects of bathing, with Italianate fountains and hot-rooms. It was built on the site of Cuddington, near Ewell, the church and village having been destroyed and compensation paid to create a suitable site.

Work started on 22 Aprilthe first day of Henry's thirtieth regnal year, and six months after the birth of his son, later Edward VI.Morden Fee in Ewell.

was assessed at 12 hides in Domesday Book, suggesting that the Ewell lands were already part of the Morden estate. By the late 13th century, when the extant Neel was lord of the sub-manor of Fitznells in Ewell, and Thomas de St Michael was lord of the neighbouring manor of Cuddington.

These properties were still in.Edited by H E Malden. Covers the south and west of the historic county, from Godalming hundred in the south to Kingston-upon-Thames in the north, now part of Greater London. Also includes accounts of (amongst others) Dorking, Guildford, Reigate and Walton on Thames.

Victoria County History - Surrey.